Oriental Perfume Making Workshop

Oriental Perfume Making Workshop

Last weekend was our Spring Perfume Making Workshop where I taught a workshop on Spring inspired Perfumes in a beautiful space above a jewellery shop in Hatton Garden.

We drunk prosecco, made some beautiful perfumes and generally made merry – it was a really relaxing, beautiful day and my guests said that they had really enjoyed the experience (infact one of them had even travelled all the way from Munich to attend!). Flattering indeed.

And for me, well to be honest it didn’t really feel like work at all. I really enjoy teaching and though I don’t know everything I enjoy the process of teaching, learning and being taught. Indeed, these ladies had some things to teach me as one was an aromatherapist, and the other a natural skincare maker. It IS nice being in the presence of likeminded fellows. Since our theme was spring we concentrated on making scents that were floral, green/aromatic and/or citrus and I really think we achieved this. The ladies were certainly very happy with their creations.

So since this Perfume Gift Experience seems to be going so well (and since I’m a little bit obsessed with it), I think I will continue!

I have just organised my next workshop which this time will be on Oriental Fragrances.

Oriental Fragrances, along with Florals, are one of the most popular types of fragrance and so I thought it would be a great idea to do a workshop using some of the sexiest aromatic materials around. Think dusky woods, musks, sensual florals and spices.

I love Clerkenwell so I decided to host the workshop in Clerkenwell again, close to Hatton Garden, Sadler’s Wells and Exmouth Market.

If prosecco, cake and perfume making sounds like a good idea to you then why don’t you come along?

Tickets are available on Eventbrite

 

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A lesson in love

A lesson in love

“Make me a Fragrance that Smells like Love”

Christian Dior

This Saturday 11th February I am going to be hosting a Valentine’s inspired Perfume Making Workshop and it’s wonderfully exciting!

When I first started learning about Perfumery some years ago, it was partly the love for the complexity and beauty of the oils that seduced me but also the mystery of this elusive and magical art. The thought of being a perfumer to me was very romantic. And somehow forbidden, because back in the days a Perfumer was to be also an alchemist, an aromatherapist, and a sacred person.

Perfumery has always been a very secretive profession and there are only a smattering of Perfumery Schools these days who even teach it. I was lucky in that I was interested in learning mainly about natural perfumes (most of the perfumes you buy these days are made with chemicals) so I was able to find a local course teaching perfumery by a very eccentric Chinese perfumer and botanist who seemed reasonably delighted with my amateur creations.  I was hooked.

What I always wanted to do however was make bespoke perfumes for people. It’s why I started making candles, to assuage my need for creating fragrances, and why I started The Secret Scent Société and why I finally, after finding the right space to do it in, have started offering Bespoke Perfume Making Classes in London. In this respect I think I’ve finally found my calling.

The first event is in London with the theme of Valentines Day which means different things for different people, but for me it definitely means flowers! So we will be making perfumes with a variety of different essential oils (as it’s a natural perfume making workshop), and people will be smelling, selecting, building, and blending their very own creations on the day.

I’m really excited about offering this experience to people and I look forward to doing many more in the future!

If you would like to know more, are thinking of coming along or know someone who might like being a perfumer for the day then forward this onto them!

Limited tickets are available to buy here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/valentines-perfume-making-workshop-tickets-30845865815

Fragrant Wishes,

Tori

Fragrance Profile: Rose

Fragrance Profile: Rose

Roses

Rose is undoubtedly the most well known, and some would say most loved of all of the florals, and it is widely used in women’s fragrances aswell as other feminine beauty products. Rose has a feminine and romantic fragrance, that uplifts and encourages feelings of love, beauty and femininity and it is particularly good for use on ageing or dry skin due to it’s wonderful moisturising properties.

There are literally thousands of varieties of Rose in the world so unsurprisingly, it has the most complex family tree of any floral species. Bulgaria produces about 70% of all the Roses in the world.

In natural perfumery Rose oil differs depending on where in the world it comes from, some have very subtle differences, and some smell completely different from one another. These rose absolutes include:
Rose Musk Otto, Bulgarian Rose, Moroccan Rose Absolute and Turkish Rose Absolute. Some roses have a greener fragrance, some are more musky, some more floral, and some are very sweet but typically the characteristic of Rose oil is it’s rich, sweet honey nectar like aroma. It has a depth, character and intensity that is unmistakable and woman particularly, but men also really enjoy looking at and smelling Rose.

Rose is typically either steam (or solvent) extracted and has a great many uses including for:
Rose Water – which is used in cooking and in skincare, Rose Hips – which are used to make syrups, vinegar, wine and jam. Rose has some amazing aromatherapy benefits too: It is uplifting, soothing and harmonising and a known aphrodisiac. It also embodies elegance, love, luxury and passion.

Rose is very expensive to buy due to the nature of it’s extraction: It takes about 60,000 roses to produce just 1 ounce of rose oil.

Some well known perfumes with Rose in them are: Dolce and Gabbana Rose The One, Bvlgari Rose Essentielle and Valentino Rose n Rose.

I think Rose is a feminine and distinctly floral oil. I like some Rose Oils better then others (Bulgarian Rose being my personal favourite), but I do think that overall it is immensely beautiful and really comes into it’s own when partnered with citrus oils to some of the most delightful and enjoyable fragrances around.

Some of the products we have made using Rose are our Solid Lotion bar and our stunning layered soy candle Creme’ De La Creme’ with Rose, Vanilla and Orange:

Solid Lotion Bar 5

Creme' De La Creme' 10

Fragrance Profile: Jasmine

Fragrance Profile: Jasmine

Jasmine Flower

Jasmine is a sweet, narcotic like floral, instantly distinguishable from most other florals for it’s deeply intoxicating, sensual aroma. It is one of the most widely used florals in perfumery and ranges between a middle to base note. There are a few variations of Jasmine namely Jasminum Sambac amd Jasminum Grandiflorum. Jasmine Sambac is native to South and South East Asia and Jasmine Grandiflorum is native to Spain and France.

Differences in Character Profile

Jasmine Grandiflorum is the most widely used Jasmine Essential Oil and has a rich and opulent fragrance with a distinctly fruity note.
It’s sister Jasmine – Jasmine Sambac, has a more of an animalic essence, with a greener note.

Jasmine is a delicate, white flower with small petals. The petals of Jasmine Sambac and Grandiflorum look almost identical apart from there size: Grandiflorum has 5 petals wheras Sambac has smaller petals, and a lot more of them.

In stark contrast to how it looks it has a very intense floral aroma, with indole notes (an animal like, fecal tone), that gives it a unique fragrance that is attractive to both men and women alike. Jasmine is used frequently in commercial perfumes, but due to the vast expense of Jasmine Essential Oil and Jasmine Absolute it is very infrequently used in it’s natural form in perfumery. Instead, a synthetic copy that is made to smell like an almost exact replica of the flower is used.

Why is Jasmine so expensive?

Jasmine, next to Rose Essential Oil, is one of the most expensive oils to buy because of it’s extraction methods. It takes 8,000 flowers to extract just 1 gram (1 ml) of Jasmine Essential Oil.
Jasmine is too delicate to withstand the steam distillation method so it is instead extracted by a complicated method called enfleurage. The methods of getting the essential oil
differ depending on the type of plant material used:

Distillation: This is the most cost effective way of extracting oils as it collects the volatile vapour of the material and then condenses the vapour back into a liquid.

Expression: A cold pressed method of extraction that is mostly used with citrus oils.

Solvent Extraction: Solvents are used to coax the essential oils out of the botanical material. There are a number of ways that this can be done:

Maceration, Enfleurage, Solvent Extraction and Hypocritical H02.

The Enfleurage Method:

Jasmine flowers are freshly handpicked and then placed between glass plates (a chassis), which is then covered with a purified and odourless vegetable or animal fat. The petals are then left within the fatty compound for at least a couple of weeks to disperse within it, being replaced with fresh petals when completely saturated and then the fatty essence is removed and washed with alcohol to separate the fat from the essence. Naturally, this is a very time consuming and labour intensive way of extracting an essential oil and thus costly. Tuberose is also extracted in this way.

Jasmine oil is a beautifully sweet and exotic oil that blends well with most if not all other florals and citrus oils. Aswell as it’s divine scent, Jasmine has many therapeutic properties, stimulating the feeling of joy, happiness, sensuality, harmony and optimism. A deeply relaxing aphrodisiac and anti-depressant, Jasmine can also help to reduce stretch marks and scars and is particularly good for use on dry skin as it increases elasticity.

Probably the most famous perfume using Jasmine (and perhaps infact the most famous perfume of all!), is Chanel No5, in which Jasmine acts to brings a beauty, strength and character to the perfume that is irreplaceable.

Some other perfumes that feature Jasmine are: Beautiful by Estee Lauder, Marc Jacobs Daisy and Jasmin Noir by Bvlgari.

Personally, I LOVE Jasmine. It has a complexity, a sensuality and a depth that is unmatched and I have used it in a lot of our products such as our beautiful white soy candle, and body souffle’:

Tuberose, Jasmine and Fig Scented Candle w box
Body Souffle' (Rose & Jasmine)

I want to know your thoughts on Jasmine! Tell me, what’s your favourite perfume featuring Jasmine? What do you love about it?